ACE’s Lorelle Espinosa Joins National Academies Committee to Study STEM Programs at MSIs

Lorelle Espinosa, assistant vice president for ACE’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy, has been tapped to serve on a new committee of higher education diversity scholars, STEM faculty, and STEM workforce professionals for the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

Increasing Admission of Low-Income Students in Engineering

A policy brief from University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education discusses results from a randomized experiment conducted to determine whether more contextualized information on low-income students’ background and high school would affect the percentage of low-income engineering students admitted.

How Land-Grant Universities Contribute to the STEM Workforce

Land-grant universities, which had an original mission to teach agriculture and mechanical arts so that working-class and African American citizens could obtain a liberal, practical education, are well positioned to prepare diverse students to enter the science, technology, mathematics, and engineering (STEM) workforce.

Texas State University’s Boots to Roots Program Brings STEM Degrees to Vets

Texas State University wants to provide potential student veterans with some answers, and help ease a shortage of qualified candidates for a number of jobs in the agricultural sciences field at the same time. So it is assisting female and Hispanic military veterans earn bachelor’s degrees in agriculture and STEM fields through a new program called Boots and Roots.

HBCUs Investing in STEM Careers

Several HBCUS are getting an extra boost encouraging careers in STEM fields thanks to a unique new partnership with Google. Designed to diversify the STEM workforce and bring students out west to the hubs of innovation in Silicon Valley, Google software engineers spend the semester on a campus to mentor and teach students and advise the institutions on the curriculum.

Women in STEM Gaining Some Ground at Doctoral Level

More from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center report we wrote about earlier this week. The promising news on women and STEM: From 2004-14, the share of doctoral degrees earned by women increased in five science and engineering disciplines.

Where Are the Women in STEM?

From decades of widely reported and debated research, we know that women have been enrolling in and graduating from college in greater numbers than men since the 1980s. But there is one area where the increased presence of women is notably missing—the so-called STEM fields: with the greatest disparities occurring in the important fields of engineering and computer science.

Partnership Seeks to Expand Successful STEM Program, Diversify Field

The Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) has been at the forefront of efforts for the past 25 years to encourage a diverse group of undergraduates to explore careers in STEM. The program has produced more than 900 graduates pursuing careers as scientists, engineers, researchers and doctors.

Innovative Partnership Breaking Down Barriers in the Science World

NPR’s CodeSwitch blog featured a great story last week on a partnership between Vanderbilt University and Fisk University—both located in Nashville—that is successfully helping women and minority students earn PhDs in the sciences.

The Times Takes on STEM. What Can Higher Ed Do?

The New York Times editorial board recently took on the issue of diversity—or the lack thereof—in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as part of a larger education series. So What role should higher education play in broadening STEM participation?