Legacy

As the new president takes office, it’s reasonable to assess the Obama administration’s higher education record and to ask what its legacy will be and how long it will last. In a preview of the Winter 2016 edition of The Presidency, ACE Senior Vice President Terry W. Hartle outlines five fundamental ways federal higher education policy has changed over the last eight years.

The Accountability Movement, College Choice and the Importance of Place

For many students, the decision of whether to attend college, let alone which college, is likely determined more by where they live than by graduation rates, programs offered or even salary after completion. ACE’s Jonathan Turk and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman discuss the importance of “place” when addressing college choice process and policy.

Proposed FLSA Regulations: Get Ready, They’re Coming

The Department of Labor is in the process of finalizing changes to the regulations governing exemptions to the Fair Labor Standard Act’s overtime pay requirements, which were first issued in July 2015. While the substance of the rule is not yet public—the final review can take up to 90 days—the National Association of College and… Read more »

Working Overtime on Campus

In 2014, President Obama signed a presidential memorandum directing the secretary of labor to develop new regulations for the Fair Labor Standards Act. The DOL’s proposal, announced last summer, would more than double the minimum salary threshold to consider excluding an employee from being paid overtime. ACE General Counsel Peter McDonough asks this will mean for higher education.

FAFSA Simplification: Harder Than It Seems

Making it easy for students and families to apply for federal student aid is a little like the Holy Grail—universally sought for its extraordinary value, but never found. And the search likely will intensify as Congress works to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, writes Terry Hartle. At issue is the FAFSA, the form that students and families must fill out to get federal student aid.

Mapping New Pathways for Native Youth

While 208,838 American Indian and Alaska Native students were enrolled in college in 2012—a 17 percent increase from 2004—46 percent are first-generation and low-income, a population that often struggles with college completion. As the White House gears up for the first Tribal Youth Gathering, Christine Nelson looks at efforts to expand higher education opportunities for these students.

College Presidents on President Obama

Inside Higher Ed today released the results of its fifth annual Survey of College and University Presidents, conducted in cooperation with Gallup. The survey includes a snapshot of what presidents think of two of President Obama’s most high-profile higher education policies, the college ratings and free community college proposals.

VIDEO: Regulation Task Force Co-Chairs Zeppos and Kirwan Testify at Senate Hearing

A few clips from today’s Senate HELP Committee hearing on the report from the Task Force on Federal Regulation of Higher Education. Testifying were the task force’s co-chairs, Chancellors William E. Kirwan of the University System of Maryland and Nicholas S. Zeppos of Vanderbilt University (TN).

VIDEO: President Obama Announces Free Community College Plan

For a summary of the proposal and media reaction, see: FRIDAY BUZZ: President Obama Proposes Two Years of Free Community College

Higher Education=Jobs

As President Obama visits Tennessee to talk about his plan for two years of free community college, The Wall Street Journal has published 10 charts explaining the December jobs report from the Labor Department.

Dear Colleague…

Sexual assault at colleges and universities is a serious problem. Protecting students is paramount to the mission of all institutions, and we know that sometimes we fail. But to help achieve real change, the federal government must partner with the higher education community on a single, clear set of federal requirements in this area.

VIDEO: How to Create and Support Diversity on Campus

Martha Kanter, under secretary at the U.S. Department of Education (above), was among the speakers at a panel discussion hosted by the Departments of Education and Justice on Sept. 27, 2013, in the wake of the June 2013 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.