Examining leadership research and trends to help higher education leaders thrive in a complex global environment and are prepared for the challenge of serving complex institutions in the modern world. By staff members from ACE’s Leadership Division and ACE member guest writers, who believe that fulfilling higher education’s mission in the 21st century depends upon a visionary, bold and diverse community of institutional leaders.

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Featured Posts

Inclusivity, History, and Navigating the Way Forward

Reaching more low‐income, underrepresented-minority, and first-generation student populations must hold a prominent place not just in our institutions’ but in our nation’s priorities as well. William E. Kirwan, chancellor emeritus of the University System of Maryland, asks if higher education is prepared to lead on the issues of inclusion facing institutions today.

Reflections on Advancing Women in Higher Education

ACE has launched a new campaign—Moving the Needle: Advancing Women in Higher Education Leadership—that asks college and university presidents to commit to helping achieve the goal that by 2030, half of U.S. college and university chief executives are women. ACE’s Lynn M. Gangone looks at women’s advancement in higher education leadership in recent years—and the prospects for the future.

Common Characteristics of Successful Leaders

Former ACE Fellow Scott Newman discusses what makes an outstanding college leader in an essay originally posted on Inside Higher Ed.

Facing Crisis in Faculty Retirement, Institutions Find Creative Solutions

Like other sectors of the U.S. workforce, higher education is facing a looming crisis in retirement as baby boomer faculty plan the next chapter of their lives. ACE’s Jean McLaughlin discusses five key takeaways on faculty retirement, for both institutions and faculty members themselves. This piece is drawn from the recent book, Faculty Retirement: Best Practices for Navigating the Transition.

Webster President Beth Stroble on College Leaders Who Tweet

The term “social media” has entered that rare stratosphere of fame and recognition normally reserved for rock stars and presidents. Now, rock stars and presidents bow to the power of social media. Webster President Beth Stroble, an enthusiastic early adopter when it comes to communication technologies, reflects on what this means for higher education.

Faculty and CFOs: It’s Not Us Versus Them

Instead of viewing each other as opposing sides, both faculty and business officers must come together to participate in budget discussions and help ensure that institutions are operating in ways that are financially sustainable, writes Audrey Bilger.