Exploring the issues central to international education and global engagement. From the staff of ACE’s Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement (CIGE) and ACE member guest contributors.

CIGE helps institutions develop and sustain comprehensive, effective internationalization programs, believing that effective internationalization goes beyond traditional study abroad programs and international student enrollment to require a comprehensive institutional commitment that also includes curriculum, research, faculty development, and active strategies for institutional engagement.

Contributors

het_international

Featured Posts

The Other 90 Percent: Global Competence for All

In the increasingly globalized world of the 21st century, colleges and universities are recognizing the need to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to live and work across borders. The big problem, however, is that in the United States, few students ever have this type of experience. Robin Helms looks at the options to give students international experiences beyond study abroad.

Faculty Play Critical Role in Campus Internationalization but Often Lack Support

Faculty play a critical role in college and university internationalization efforts, although institutional support for this engagement is often lacking.

Opening Cuba and the World to Webster University Students

On Dec. 17, 2014, President Obama announced that he was restoring full diplomatic relations with Cuba, a historic decision that is ending over 50 years of frozen relations. Higher education has been one of the main beneficiaries of these early efforts. Beth Stroble, president of Webster University in Missouri, explores the future for continued cooperation between U.S. and Cuban institutions.

Joint and Dual Degree Programs Gain Steam Worldwide

ACE’s Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement’s 2014 report, Mapping International Joint and Dual Degrees: U.S. Program Profiles and Perspectives explores the landscape of such programs in the United States, including characteristics and policies, academic focus areas, partner locations and programmatic challenges, and their role in broader institutional strategy and planning.

Going International

For many United States colleges and universities, increasing international student enrollment has become a strategic priority. Such students often pay full tuition, and amid state funding and other cutbacks, admissions offices are increasingly reaching across national borders in their recruiting campaigns. But that’s not the only reason to go international, writes Robin Matross Helms.

Going Global

Prospects for alternative measures of institutional achievement have been welcomed by many for their potential to focus on institutional progress through the lens of student learning outcomes assessment. Several international organizations have taken an especially strong interest in this aspect of accountability, particularly the OECD, write Brad Farnsworth and Patti McGill Peterson.

mapping-coming-2017-hena-blog-ad