The latest on innovative strategies that support postsecondary attainment for all students, including adults and underrepresented minority populations, by the staff of ACE’s Center for Education Attainment and Innovation (CEAI), guest writers and ACE members working to advance new higher education models to expand access and success.

From its first programs for returning World War II veterans, ACE’s CEAI has led the national movement to recognize and promote adult learner programs in higher education. As the highly respected leader in the evaluation of workforce and military training, the Center demonstrates its commitment to adult learning and attainment through a wide range of programs and initiatives that support postsecondary access and success.

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Featured Posts

Three Trends Worth Watching for Continuing Education Leaders

More than 36 million adults between 25 and 64 years of age have completed some college, but don’t have a degree. Further, there are 44.5 million American adults with high school diplomas, but no college experience. Cathy Sandeen identifies a few emerging trends institutions might consider in their quest to serve this massive market of non-traditional students.

Confronting Higher Education  Consumerism Challenges

The higher education community is well aware of the evolving demographic, economic and technological forces presenting both challenges and opportunities to colleges and universities. But one less-noticed but increasingly powerful driver of higher education change is the concept of consumerism. Cathy Sandeen writes on how the demand for more information is shaping the 21st century college campus.

A MOOC by Any Other Name? An Online Course

“I’d aspired to give people a profound education—to teach them something substantial…but the data was at odds with this idea,” declared Sebastian Thrun, founder of the Silicon Valley MOOC platform Udacity in a recent Fast Company article. But if you have been tracking Thrun’s work over the past year, you will see his statement as nothing terribly new, writes Cathy Sandeen.

The Emerging World of Alternative Credentials

Digital badges. Verified certificates. Alternative credentials. More and more people are finding new ways—outside of traditional postsecondary degree programs—to show employers they possess the skills and knowledge needed for a constantly changing workplace, writes Cathy Sandeen.