The latest on innovative strategies that support postsecondary attainment for all students, including adults and underrepresented minority populations, by the staff of ACE’s Center for Education Attainment and Innovation (CEAI), guest writers and ACE members working to advance new higher education models to expand access and success.

From its first programs for returning World War II veterans, ACE’s CEAI has led the national movement to recognize and promote adult learner programs in higher education. As the highly respected leader in the evaluation of workforce and military training, the Center demonstrates its commitment to adult learning and attainment through a wide range of programs and initiatives that support postsecondary access and success.

Contributors

Featured Posts

Mapping New Pathways for Native Youth

While 208,838 American Indian and Alaska Native students were enrolled in college in 2012—a 17 percent increase from 2004—46 percent are first-generation and low-income, a population that often struggles with college completion. As the White House gears up for the first Tribal Youth Gathering, Christine Nelson looks at efforts to expand higher education opportunities for these students.

From Access to Graduation: Supporting Post-9/11 Undergraduate Student Veterans

Given the huge investment in veterans’ postsecondary education represented by the Post-9/11 GI Bill, one could argue that veterans who use this generous benefit are in a good position to enroll in college and ultimately earn a postsecondary certificate or degree. And some do. But for veterans who didn’t finish college, what were the barriers to their success?

General Education, the Four-Year Degree and Employment: What Needs to Change?

Which segment of the four-year degree is supposed to enhance students’ employable skills and prepare them for a job? Most would probably think, the courses in their degree major. But increasingly, employers are saying they can train employees in the specialized technical skills associated with their jobs. It’s the intangible skills that they hope will be taught by colleges and universities.

Credit  for  Prior  Learning:  Why  All  the  Controversy?

Does the acceptance of prior learning actually lead to less or more revenue for colleges and universities? We don’t know yet, because no one has really researched the impact on institutions’ bottom lines. This research, while not easy, is necessary, writes Deborah Seymour.

Three Trends Worth Watching for Continuing Education Leaders

More than 36 million adults between 25 and 64 years of age have completed some college, but don’t have a degree. Further, there are 44.5 million American adults with high school diplomas, but no college experience. Cathy Sandeen identifies a few emerging trends institutions might consider in their quest to serve this massive market of non-traditional students.

Confronting Higher Education  Consumerism Challenges

The higher education community is well aware of the evolving demographic, economic and technological forces presenting both challenges and opportunities to colleges and universities. But one less-noticed but increasingly powerful driver of higher education change is the concept of consumerism. Cathy Sandeen writes on how the demand for more information is shaping the 21st century college campus.