The latest on innovative strategies that support postsecondary attainment for all students, including adults and underrepresented minority populations, by the staff of ACE’s Center for Education Attainment and Innovation (CEAI), guest writers and ACE members working to advance new higher education models to expand access and success.

From its first programs for returning World War II veterans, ACE’s CEAI has led the national movement to recognize and promote adult learner programs in higher education. As the highly respected leader in the evaluation of workforce and military training, the Center demonstrates its commitment to adult learning and attainment through a wide range of programs and initiatives that support postsecondary access and success.

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Featured Posts

Reimagining Remediation in Tennessee

With implementation of the Tennessee Promise, higher education is looking to Tennessee for lessons learned during its foray into the world of free community college. The Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) is no less a stranger to scrutiny for its innovative practices in developmental education. Tristan Denley discusses TBR’s pioneering approach to remediation.

Supporting First-Generation and Low-Income Students at the University of Florida

First launched in 2006, the Machen Florida Opportunity Scholars Program supports nearly 1,250 undergraduates annually and will soon surpass the 2,000 alumni milestone. For the first-generation and low-income students in the program, early estimates indicate that they are 44 percent more likely to graduate in four years and 47 percent more likely to complete in six years compared to their peers.

How to Navigate the Credentialing Maze

The stunning increase in the number and variety of credentials available in this country—college degrees, educational certificates, industry credentials, licensures, and most recently micro-credentials, such as digital badges—seems like a positive thing. However, the complex and fragmented nature of the credentialing marketplace is having the opposite effect—mass confusion.

Mapping New Pathways for Native Youth

While 208,838 American Indian and Alaska Native students were enrolled in college in 2012—a 17 percent increase from 2004—46 percent are first-generation and low-income, a population that often struggles with college completion. As the White House gears up for the first Tribal Youth Gathering, Christine Nelson looks at efforts to expand higher education opportunities for these students.

From Access to Graduation: Supporting Post-9/11 Undergraduate Student Veterans

Given the huge investment in veterans’ postsecondary education represented by the Post-9/11 GI Bill, one could argue that veterans who use this generous benefit are in a good position to enroll in college and ultimately earn a postsecondary certificate or degree. And some do. But for veterans who didn’t finish college, what were the barriers to their success?

General Education, the Four-Year Degree and Employment: What Needs to Change?

Which segment of the four-year degree is supposed to enhance students’ employable skills and prepare them for a job? Most would probably think, the courses in their degree major. But increasingly, employers are saying they can train employees in the specialized technical skills associated with their jobs. It’s the intangible skills that they hope will be taught by colleges and universities.